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AlphaDog

Details

AlphaDog is a quadruped robot the size of a mule (a big, mean mule). It's powered by a hydraulic actuation system and is designed to assist soldiers in carrying heavy gear over rough terrain.

Creator
Boston Dynamics
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2011
Type
Military & Security, Research
Creator
Boston Dynamics
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2011
Type
Military & Security, Research

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Specs

FEATURES
Up to 181 kg (400 lb) of payload, dynamic locomotion over steep and slippery terrain.
HEIGHT
190 cm | 74.8 in (fully extended legs)
LENGTH
200 cm | 78.7 in
WIDTH
90 cm | 35.4 in
WEIGHT
362.9 kg | 800 lb
SPEED
N/A km/h | N/A mph

SENSORS
Legs with joint position and force sensors. Body with gyroscope and stereo vision system. Hydraulic system with pressure and temperature sensors.
ACTUATORS
Hydraulic actuators
POWER
Internal combustion engine
COMPUTING
Custom PC
SOFTWARE
N/A
DEGREES OF FREEDOM (DOF)
12
MATERIALS
N/A
COST
N/A
STATUS
Ongoing
HISTORY
Boston Dynamics, led by Marc Raibert, was funded by DARPA and the U.S. Marine Corps. to develop a highly mobile, semi-autonomous legged robot, the Legged Squad Support System (LS3), to help alleviate physical weight on troops. In early 2012, the LS3 prototype underwent its first outdoor exercise, demonstrating the ability to follow a person using its vision system. Next DARPA plans to complete development of key mobile and sensing capabilities to ensure LS3 is able to support dismounted squads of soldiers in the battlefield. The team working on LS3 (also known as AlphaDog) includes engineers and scientists from Boston Dynamics, Bell Helicopter, AAI Corporation, Carnegie Mellon, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Woodward HRT.
WEBSITE
http://www.bostondynamics.com

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