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Aquanaut

Details

Aquanaut is an unmanned underwater vehicle that can transform itself from a nimble submarine designed for long-distance cruising into a half-humanoid robot capable of carrying out complex manipulation tasks. It can inspect subsea oil and gas infrastructure, operate valves, and use tools.

Creator
Houston Mechatronics Inc.
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2019
Type
Underwater, Industrial
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2019
Type
Underwater, Industrial

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Specs

FEATURES
All-electric vehicle, high level of autonomy. Operates completely untethered and does not require support ships as with traditional ROVs. The current version can travel more than 200 kilometers in submarine mode and has a maximum operational depth of 300 meters.
HEIGHT
97 cm | 38 in (closed), 160 cm | 63 in (open)
LENGTH
350 cm | 138 in
WIDTH
152 cm | 60 in
WEIGHT
1050 kg | 2314 lb
SPEED
13 km/h | 8 mph (7 knots)

SENSORS
Manipulators with joint absolute position and force and torque sensing at the end-effector. Vehicle body contains an inertial navigation system, Doppler Velocity Logs (DVLs), ultra-short baseline, machine vision cameras, forward-looking sonar, scanning sonars, GPS, and custom 3D structured light.
ACTUATORS
Electric
POWER
Rechargeable lithium-ion
COMPUTING
Custom control and computing package
SOFTWARE
Custom software built around ROS framework
DEGREES OF FREEDOM (DOF)
26 (Arm: 7 DoF x 2; Arm end-effector: 1 DoF x 2; Propulsion: 7 DoF; Head: 2 DoF; Transformation Mechanism: 1 DoF)
MATERIALS
Syntactic foam with composite overlay
COST
N/A
STATUS
Ongoing
WEBSITE
https://www.houstonmechatronics.com

History

Houston Mechatronics was started by former NASA roboticists who worked on advanced technologies used in complex space missions. Founders Matt Ondler, Reg Berka, and Nic Radford want to bring their robotics expertise to industries that include energy, offshore oil and gas, defense, and seabed mining. They have raised more than US $23 million in venture capital since starting HMI in 2014. The company, based in Houston, Texas, is developing an all-electric underwater transforming vehicle called Aquanaut. It combines the capabilities of both an underwater autonomous vehicle, or AUV, and a remotely operated underwater vehicle, or ROV. When in AUV mode, it can travel long distances of up to 200 km (108 nautical miles) in one mission while mapping its surroundings and performing structure inspections. In ROV mode, the robot can turn valves, use subsea tools, and perform other manipulation tasks.