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Bandit

Details

Bandit is a friendly, socially assistive humanoid robot. It's been used to help children with autism, motivate older adults in physical exercise, and provide therapies to stroke patients.

Creator
USC Interaction Lab and BlueSky Robotics
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2006
Type
Research, Medical
Creator
USC Interaction Lab and BlueSky Robotics
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2006
Type
Research, Medical

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Specs

FEATURES
Capable of exhibiting a wide range of social gestures and facial expressions. Torso can be paired with a wheeled base for mobility.
HEIGHT
56 cm | 22 in
LENGTH
40.6 cm | 16 in
WIDTH
18 cm | 7 in
WEIGHT
7.7 kg | 17 lb
SPEED
N/A km/h | mph

SENSORS
Head with two Firewire cameras (eyes). Microsoft Kinect and custom IMUs (depending on use).
ACTUATORS
12 DC motors, seven servos.
POWER
12-V 6-A power supply
COMPUTING
Intel Core 2 Duo mini PC
SOFTWARE
64-bit Ubuntu OS, ROS (Robot Operating System), custom control software.
DEGREES OF FREEDOM (DOF)
19 (Arm: 7 DoF x 2; Head: 5 DoF)
MATERIALS
Plastic, aluminum, PCB.
COST
$15,000
STATUS
Ongoing
HISTORY
The goal of the Bandit project was developing a humanoid robot for research in socially assistive robotics, including interaction with children and adults in school, home, office, and hospital settings. Led by Maja Mataric, a team at the Interaction Lab at University of Southern California in Los Angeles and BlueSky Robotics designed a robot that is safe, expressive, and affordable. Bandit uses joint friction to hold the arms in a desired pose and a small amount of power to move to new poses. This limits its manipulation skills but lets it gesture and interact safely with people. Its relatively small size means users are not intimidated, and its face is simple, so it is easy to relate to and understand. The first prototype was created in 2004; the researchers designed an improved version in 2006 and 2007. In 2007 and 2008 they built six copies of the new design, which are the robots they use in their studies today.
WEBSITE
http://robotics.usc.edu/interaction

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