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Raven II

Details

Raven II is a surgical robot designed as an open platform for collaborative research. The goal is to improve telesurgery capabilities as well as enable robots to perform some tasks autonomously.

Creator
University of Washington and UC Santa Cruz
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2012
Type
Medical, Research
Creator
University of Washington and UC Santa Cruz
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2012
Type
Medical, Research

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Specs

FEATURES
Equipped with two arms and one camera. Surgeon side equipped with Phantom Omni haptic devices. Local control or telesurgery mode via Internet.
HEIGHT
58 cm | 23 in
LENGTH
127 cm | 50 in
WIDTH
112 cm | 44 in
WEIGHT
46 kg | 101 lb
SPEED
N/A km/h | mph

SENSORS
Each motor with optical encoder to detect shaft rotation and estimate robot joint position. Surgeon side includes user interface and two Phantom Omni haptic devices to detect the surgeon's hand motion.
ACTUATORS
Each arm has 7 brushless DC motors at base; robot links and tools driven through cable mechanism.
POWER
Standard 110-V power supply and two 9-V batteries.
COMPUTING
Intel Atom-based computer
SOFTWARE
Open-source custom software, with ROS, C, and C++ interfaces running on real-time Ubuntu OS. Surgeon interface runs on Windows or other OS.
DEGREES OF FREEDOM (DOF)
14 (Arm: 7 DoF x 2)
MATERIALS
Aluminum and steel cables.
COST
$250,000
STATUS
Ongoing
HISTORY
The initial versions of the Raven platform were developed in 2005 as part of a DARPA project on the future of battlefield medicine. The Raven II was developed as an National Science Foundation project on collaborative research to advance surgical robotics. Seven Universities have begun research using the Raven II platform, including Harvard University; Johns Hopkins University; University of Nebraska; University of California, Santa Cruz; University of California, Berkeley; and University of Washington. These labs are investigating diverse problems involving surgical robots and related technologies and are able to share their experiences and breakthroughs using Raven as a common platform. Several more university and hospital research labs plan to join the effort soon.
WEBSITE
http://r2db.tumblr.com

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