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Robonaut 2

Details

Robonaut 2 is a humanoid sent to the International Space Station to help astronauts with various tasks. It can grasp objects, flip switches, and high-five crew members after successfully performing tasks.

Creator
NASA Johnson Space Center and GM
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2010
Type
Aerospace, Humanoid
Creator
NASA Johnson Space Center and GM
Country
United States πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ
Year
2010
Type
Aerospace, Humanoid

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Specs

FEATURES
Dexterous manipulation of human tools. Able to lift 9 kg (20 lb). Equipped with autonomous and teleoperation modes (from the ISS or Earth).
HEIGHT
101.6 cm | 40 in (waist to head)
LENGTH
N/A cm | N/A in
WIDTH
78.74 cm | 31 in
WEIGHT
149.7 kg | 330 lb
SPEED
N/A km/h | N/A mph

SENSORS
More than 350 sensors, including custom six-axis load cells in the hands, four cameras behind the visor (two for stereo vision and two auxiliary), and infrared camera in the mouth area for depth perception.
ACTUATORS
54 servomotors
POWER
Power conversion system housed inside backpack for tethered operation. Backpack with batteries for untethered operation.
COMPUTING
38 PowerPC processors
SOFTWARE
N/A
DEGREES OF FREEDOM (DOF)
42 (Arm: 7 DoF x 2; Hand: 12 DoF x 2; Neck: 3 DoF; Waist: 1 DoF)
MATERIALS
Primarily aluminum with steel.
COST
$2.5 million
STATUS
Ongoing
HISTORY
The Robonaut project began in 1997 with the goal of developing a humanoid robot that could assist astronauts with a variety of manipulation tasks. The result was R1, a prototype robot that could perform maintenance tasks or be mounted on a set of wheels. In 2007, NASA Johnson Space Center and General Motors teamed up to develop a next-generation Robonaut. R2 was unveiled in 2010, and NASA mission managers were so impressed that they decided to make room on a shuttle mission and send the robot to the International Space Station. R2 was carried to the ISS aboard space shuttle Discovery in February 2011. Its primary job for now is demonstrating to engineers how such dexterous robots behave in space, though the hope is that, through upgrades, Robonaut will eventually take over tasks too dangerous or repetitive for astronauts, as well as venture outside the station to help spacewalkers make repairs and perform scientific work.
WEBSITE
http://robonaut.jsc.nasa.gov