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Twendy One

Details

Twendy One is a humanoid with strong arms, dexterous hands, and a mobile base. It's intended to assist the elderly in their homes by helping them move around and taking care of household tasks.

Creator
Waseda University
Country
Japan πŸ‡―πŸ‡΅
Year
2007
Type
Humanoids, Research
Country
Japan πŸ‡―πŸ‡΅
Year
2007
Type
Humanoids, Research

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Specs

FEATURES
Equipped with high-performance actuators. Capable of grasping objects of various shapes and assisting a person to stand up and walk.
HEIGHT
146.7 cm | 57.8 in
LENGTH
N/A cm | N/A in
WIDTH
73.4 cm | 28.9 in
WEIGHT
111 kg | 244.7 lb
SPEED
2.7 km/h | 1.7 mph

SENSORS
Stereo cameras, five six-axis force sensors, 60 position sensors, more than 600 distributed force sensors.
ACTUATORS
51 AC servomotors
POWER
Lithium-ion battery, 30 minutes of operation
COMPUTING
Seven Pentium processors
SOFTWARE
Linux OS. Custom software.
DEGREES OF FREEDOM (DOF)
47
MATERIALS
Silicone, plastic, and metal.
COST
N/A
STATUS
Ongoing
WEBSITE
http://www.twendyone.com

History

Roboticists Tully Foote and Melonee Wise developed the first version of TurtleBot while at Willow Garage in late 2010. They wanted to build a small robot capable of running the Robot Operating System, or ROS, the robotics software platform under development at Willow. According to Tully, the goal was to "prove that you could run ROS on an Intel Atom-scale processor." The initial TurtleBot prototype consisted of an iRobot Create base with a Microsoft Kinect, a gyro, a battery pack, and a power board mounted on top; the robot also carried an Asus 1215N laptop running ROS. The idea was to develop a baseline platform and then publish the design, so others could build and improve on the robot. But after Foote and Wise discovered that there was interest in buying the robot, they redesigned the prototype into a production-level system. In August 2011, Willow, in collaboration with two robot manufacturers, started shipping TurtleBots. "And then, everyone had TurtleBots! It was crazy! All of a sudden, we saw YouTube videos about TurtleBots, papers being published," Wise recalls. "We would just get all sorts of cool things that we never expected people to do with TurtleBots."